Japanese Traditional Fishing Method

May 15, 2017

by Hosono Natsumi and Haruka Onishi

Cormorant Fishing at Night

Ukai, or ‘cormorant fishing’ is a traditional fishing method using a cormorant bird to catch ayu (sweetfish). The season for cormorant fishing is from the middle of May to the middle of October of each year. Interestingly, ukai is often practiced at night. Fishermen make a fire on the fishing boat because ayu have a habit of gathering in lighted places in the dark. This allows the cormorants to catch the fish more easily. However ukai is never practiced on the night of a full moon, because the ayu do not gather around the light of the fire so well. The people who train and control the cormorants are called ‘cormorant fishermen’. The number of cormorants used at one time differ by region and fisherman, but the average number is five to ten. Cormorant fishermen have to know exactly when cormorants swallow the fish so that they can call the cormorants back to the boat and have them regurgitate the fish into a basket.

History of Cormorant Fishing

Cormorant fishing in Japan has a long history. It is unknown who began cormorant fishing. However, a history book published in 712 A.D. mentions cormorant fishing. This suggests that it has been practiced for at least 1300 years or more. Not only do Japan and China have a history of ukai in their cultures, but surprisingly ukai was practiced as a sport in Europe from the 16th to 17th centuries. The fish caught by cormorants lose consciousness in esophagus of the cormorant without injury. This keeps the fish fresh and uninjured, making them highly valued in the marketplace. However, due to its inefficiency in comparison with standard methods of fishing with nets and hooks, the popularity of cormorant fishing gradually decreased over time. Now, it is mostly done in Japan for the tourism industry.

Cormorants

Cormorant in Kyoto

Cormorants are highly intelligent birds and can understand hierarchical relationships. They are about 80 cm in length and have a sharp crooked bill. Therefore they are suited for fishing. Cormorant craftsmen catch wild cormorants.

Wild cormorants are well-trained. Cormorant fishermen take care of them every day for 2 or 3 years. In general, the longevity of a cormorant is from 4 to 5 years, but the cormorants used in Ukai are treated carefully. For this reason, their lifespan is from 15 to 20 years. Cormorant fishermen do their work with the birds around the noon. This practice is what is often shown to the public.

What is the life cormorant fishing like? In the morning, after checking the condition of their birds, the fishermen decide which cormorant take to fishing. In the afternoon, fishermen give the birds free time to relax in the water. The fishermen don’t feed them so much because hungry cormorants can catch their own fish quite well. In the evening, fishermen take chosen cormorants fishing. It is important not to tie their throat too strongly because it will decrease the birds’ motivation. On the other hand, if the rope is too loose, most of fish get swallowed completely. After fishing, fishermen feed and stroke their cormorants to thank them for their efforts.

Cormorant Fishermen

Most cormorant fishermen are born into their craft via long lines of cormorant fishermen. Still, they need a long training period to become fully qualified. First, they need a strong grip and skillful hand movements because the power of cormorants pulling the ropes is quite strong. In addition, it is difficult to make cormorants eject the fish from their throats. This is done by holding the birds’ throats in just the right way. Although cormorant fishing is done only in during the warmer months of the year, fishermen must still take daily care of their birds year round. They have to feed them, take care of their bills, and clean their cages with love.

Where to Observe Cormorant Fishing

The best ukai season is in the summer evenings. If you are interested in observing ukai, you should reserve an ukai tour in advance because it is very popular and crowded. Moreover the road to the spot is also crowded, so you ought to arrive as early as you can.

In Japan, there are about a dozen famous ukai locations, one of them being Kyoto. Kyoto actually has ukai areas, one of them is near the Uji River and the other is near Ooi Arashiyama. But it is the one near Arashiyama that is the most popular.

Getting to Arashiyama

From Kyoto station, take the JR Sagano Sanin Line (#3) to Saga Arasiyama station. It takes about 15 minutes and it costs \240. From the Randen station (Keifuku train), take the train to Arasiyama station, the last stop on that line. On the other hand, if you have One-Day Bus ticket, take the No. 28 bus, which takes about an hour from Kyoto station.

Reference

Ukai

Arashiyama

Takaragaike Park

 

Marino Takeuchi & Nao Mochizuki

 The History of Takaragaike and the Park

Takaragaike is a small artificial lake made in the middle of the Edo period, and its original purpose was for drawing water into the surrounding fields. At first, it was only a small pond, created by damming spring water, but it is said to have become as large as its present size by the end of the Edo period. During World War II, a plan for the development of Takaragaike Park was made. The park area was originally planned to be a Bouku Ryokuchi, or an evacuation area, for people to avoid air raids and to prevent fire from spreading into urban areas. In 1958, bicycle racing, which had been held at the Kyoto Bicycle Racing Track here, was discontinued and instead the playground “Paradise for Children” (Kodomo no Rakuen) was built on the site. In 1961, the construction of the Kyoto International Conference Center was decided upon, and after that many facilities such as the Forest of Rest and Relaxation (Ikoi no Mori), the Forest of Wild Birds (Yachou no Mori) and the Forest of Cherry Blossoms (Sakura no Mori) were introduced. Today, the grounds including these facilities and the lake is called Takaragaike Park, and covers an area of 62.7 hectares.

The Lake

The Lake

Facilities in the park

The “Paradise for Children” playground (Kodomo no Rakuen) is a place which is surrounded by a thickly wooded area and is a special place for children. There are three areas for youngsters here:  the playground which is set up with playground equipment and a sandbox, a large open space with grass and a rest area, and an experience area, where people can touch a lot of living things and plants. This park can only be used by young children and their parents, and people who are more than junior high school student age (except children’s parents) may not enter.  The Forest of Rest and Relaxation (Ikoi no Mori) is a place where one can observe wild birds and was formerly the home for a racing stable exclusively for the use of the Heian cavalry.  The stables of the Kyoto Prefectural Police Department are here now, and you can see horses which are used for patroling and traffic safety campaigns. There is also an experience of riding the horses on offer to children up to nine years old.

Takaragaike    

This lake is surrounded by a lot of nature even though it is inside the environs of Kyoto city. In the lake, there are creatures such as turtles, carp, frogs and birds. Various plants border the water’s edge, and you can enjoy seasonable scenes whenever you go. Especially in spring, many people come here to view the cherry blossoms and the park becomes quite crowded. There is a promenade around the lake, and many people like walking, jogging and running marathons. You can rent a rowing boat or pedal boat, and buy food to feed the fish at the shop near the lakeside.

Koi carp

Koi carp

The Promenade

The promenade

 Surrounding area

Located on the edge of the park are some famous buildings such as the Grand Prince Hotel Kyoto and the Kyoto International Conference Center where the Kyoto Protocol was signed. There are also a lot of eating places, such as cafés, restaurants and so on.

Access to Takaragaike park

The closest station is Kokusaikaikan Subway Station, on the Kyoto City Karasuma subway line, which is located right outside the north entrance to the park. It is also about 10 – 15 minutes north on foot from Matsugasaki station on the same subway line.