Instandhaltung der traditionellen Häuser in Kyoto

September 14, 2019

                                                                                                   Von Yoshimasa Mima

2018 besuchten über 50 Million Touristen Kyoto. Jetzt werden viele Hotels gebaut. Auch viele historisch wichtige Privathäuser (Machiya) werden umgebaut.

Von der Kommission für Fragen hinsichtlich traditioneller Häuser wurden fünf Erhaltungszonen für solche Häuser und 410 einzelne Objekte ausgewählt, aber das „Sugimoto-Haus“ war nicht darunter.

Das Sugimoto Haus (5 Geh-Minuten bis zur Kreuzung Shijo-Horikawa)

1743 gründet die Familie Sugimoto eine Kimono-Handlung namens Naraya im Kyotoer Stadtteil Karasuma Shijo-sagaru. Sie kauften Kimonos in Kyoto ein und verkauften sie im Kanto-Gebiet, besonders in den Präfekturen Ibaragi und Chiba.

Die Fassade ist 50 Meter breit und die Tiefe beträgt 70 Meter. Es gibt einen Laden, eine Wohnung, drei Lagerhäuser und drei Gärten.

1764 zog die Familie ins Yada-Viertel im Stadteil Shimogyo-ku. Nach einem Großbrand in der Genji Ära wurde das Geschäft neu aufgebaut. 1992 wurde eine Stiftung gegründet, die „Naraya Memorial Sugimoto Residence Preservation Society“. Jeden Monat gibt es wechselnde Ausstellungen und kommentierte Besichtigungen.

Jährlicher Veranstaltungskalender

1. Frühling

    a) 3. April in Kyoto (normalerweise 3. März): Das Puppenfest für Mädchen

    b) 5. Mai: Das Jungenfest

2. Sommer

     a) 1. Juni Wohnungsumräumung wegen der sommerlichen Hitze

               (Türen und Schiebetüren werden umgeräumt)

    b) 4. – 16. Juli. Gion Fest (Yasaka Schrein) 17. Juli. Yamahoko Junko

3. Herbst

    a) Wohnungsumräumungen wegen des kalten Winters

4. Winter

    a) 31. Dezember Silvesterfest

    b) 1. Januar Neujahrsfest

Jährlicher Veranstaltungskalender auf der Sugimoto Residence Webseite

Webseite Rathaus Kyoto (Stadt Kyoto)

Yamahoko Junko

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Kimono Date Plan in Kyoto

by Norika Uchida, Kanako Fukushima, Noeka

Kawamura Have you ever tried to wear a kimono or yukata? They are famous Japanese traditional attire. Also, kimono were worn by people during the Heian Era (794-1185). Kimono nowadays are worn only for special occasions such as weddings or graduation from school. Conversely, a yukata are a little more casual and are the standard outfit for going to firework festivals in the summer. The Gion Festival is held every July in Kyoto, and you can see a lot of people wearing yukata there. In Kyoto you can experience wearing kimono or yukata, as there are many shops where you can rent them easily. Let us then recommend some good kimono rental shops, and the perfect plan for wearing your kimono on a date with your special someone

In Kyoto, there are many kimono and yukata rental shops where you can rent them easily and dress up like a tradiational Japanese person. So, we will now introduce some of our recommended rental shops to you.

Kyoto Kimono Rental Wargo

The first is Kyoto Kimono Rental Wargo. This shop’s selling point is that they have various plans. For example, The popular standard plan is reasonable with good value, so we recommended this plan to those who are renting a kimono for the first time. This plan costs 3,500 yen (without tax). Then, the Premium Kimono Plan offers many famous brand name kimono. This plan is perfect for the people who want to enjoy the luxury of decorative modern kimono. This plan costs 4,500 yen (without tax). Also, there is the High-end Kimono Plan, which has the best luxurious brand-name kimono with various patterns, so if you can afford it, you should choose this plan. This plan is 5,500 yen (without tax).

Access
1 minute walk from Randen Lines [Saga-Arashiyama Station]
1 minute walk from Keihan Kyoto Line [Gion-Shijo station]
2 minutes walk from Kyoto Station
It’s on the 3rd floor of the Kyoto Tower Building.

Opening hours: 9am – 7pm

Kyo-Temari

The next shop is named, Kyo-Temari. The main selling points of this shop are its simple price and its photography plans. Here, you can rent a high-class, 100% silk kimono at a price of 5,000yen (with tax) which includes dressing up. Also, you can experience a variety of photo shoots, including studio photo shoots and on-location photo shoots. Of course, you can receive the digital data from the photo shoot, and it is also possible to make an album. This plan will certainly give you an awesome Kyoto experience. However, you need to tell the shop what you would like to do when making a reservation.

Access

a 3 minutes walk from Hankyu Kyoto Line [Hankyu Kawaramachi Station], or 5 minutes walk from [Karasuma Station] •5 minutes walk from Kyoto City Subway [Shijo Station] •5 minutes walk from Keihan Main Line Gion [Shijo Station]

Opening hours: 09:00am – 07:00pm

Taking a Rickshaw Ride

We recommend a taking a rickshaw ride when you wear a kimono and go on a date in Kyoto. We often see many couples wearing kimono and riding rickshaws in Kyoto. Rickshaws are mainly used for sightseeing purposes at tourist spots. In Kyoto, Ebisuya runs rickshaw services in the Arashiyama and Higashiyama districts of the city. So, you can ride them there.

In Arashiyama, you can start from the Togetsu-Kyo Bridge, go to the Bamboo Forest, and look around the temples of Sagano, such as Nison-in and Jojakko-ji.

In Higashiyama, you can start from Ichinenzaka or Heian-jingu Shrine, and look around Kiyomizu-dera, Gion and Nanzen-ji.

The price is 3,000 yen per person and 4,000 yen per couple for the cheapest course. Also, there are 30-minute and 1-hour courses. The 30-minute course is 7,000 yen per person, or 9,000 yen per two people. The 1-hour course is 13,000 yen per person, or 17,500 yen per two people. The price is a bit expensive, but it is worth it!

When you ride in a rickshaw, you can enjoy the sights from a slightly higher position. And, you can enjoy them slowly because you are just sitting. So, you do not get tired, even if you wear a kimono. Also, a blanket is provided to keep you warm in winter. Furthermore, rickshaws have a roof, so you can ride them even on rainy or snowy days.

In addition, the rickshaw man will explain many interesting things to you about Kyoto in English. So, it will surely help you have a memorable date in Kyoto. Moreover, he takes a lot of pictures at various spots that are beautiful and photogenic. I absolutely think you will love it. Please enjoy the best dating in Kyoto by rickshaw.

Rickshaw of Ebisuya
View from a rickshaw

Ebisuya in Arashiyama Access:

Address: 3-24 sagatenryu-ji bounobaabamachi ukyo-ku Kyoto Japan
Opening hours: 9:30 am – sunset (There is fluctuation by the season.)

It’s a 4 minute walk from Keifuku railway Arashiyama station, and a 7 minute walk from Hankyu Arashiyama station.

Tel: 075-864-0690

Ebisuya in Higashiyama Access:

Address: 558-9 yugyomaecho higashiyama-ku Kyoto Japan
Opening hours: 10:00 am – 18:00 pm (weekday) 10:00 am – 18:30 pm (Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays) There is fluctuation by the season.

It’s a 5 minute walk from Kyoto city bus Higashiyamayasui, and a (Ichinenzaka) 1-2 minute walk from Kyoto city bus Ginkaku-ji mae. (Ginkaku-ji bashi)

Tel: 075-533-2600

You can also make a reservation.

Arashiyama Yoshimura and Arabica Kyoto

We also recommend going to Arashiyama during your kimono wearing experience because Arashiyama is one of the many beautiful places in Kyoto. There is such a good atmosphere there, so couples can have deep long talks and enjoy a meaningful moments together. So, we highly recommend visiting Arashiyama on your date.

In Arashiyama, you will see the Togetsu-kyo bridge, which has become an iconic symbol of Arashiyama. Many movies and dramas were filmed there. Also, there is a bamboo forest that has become a famous spot in Kyoto.

In addition, there are other places that you can enjoy around Arashiyama. One such place is a soba restaurant called Yoshimura. Soba are noodles made from buckwheat flour. The restaurant is located near the Togetsu-kyo bridge, so you can enjoy eating your noodles with a good view the river and a sense of openness. You will have a great time eating soba there. When we went there, we ordered Tenzaruzen for 2019 yen. It included soba, tempura, rice, and pickles that were made in Kyoto.

View from the 2nd floor
Tenenzaruzen for 2019 yen

Yoshimura is really popular, so you might have to wait if you don’t have a reservation. You can get a reservation online, but making a phone call is more reliable than trying to reserve online.

When we went there, there were a lot of people – both Japanese and foreigners – who had already been waiting. Since we didn’t have a reservation, we had to wait for an entire hour. However, it is easy to kill some time if you have to wait because there are some shops nearby. They are some good places to pick up some souvenirs or get a cup of coffee.

There is also a famous café along the river, called Arabica. There is often a long line at this coffee shop. They have two shops in Kyoto, and one is located in Arashiyama. Their coffee is tasty for sure. Also, we recommended their lemonade, if it is hot outside.

Front of store
Their signature is “%”.

Arashiyama Yoshimura Access:

Opening hours: 11:00am~5:00pm (Off season) 10:30am~(Peak season)

It’s a 3 minute walk from Keifuku railway Arashiyama station.

English, Chinese, Korean and Taiwanese menu are available.

Arabica Kyoto Arashiyama Access:

Opening hours 8:00 – 18:00

It’s a 5 minute walk from Keifuku railway Arashiyama station.

Conclusion

Having a kimono or yukata experience with your partner must be an unforgettable memory in your life. There is no doubt that you can have an awesome time in Kyoto. Also, kimono have various patterns and colors, so maybe you can try to wear another design when you come to Kyoto again. Wouldn’t it be amazing to make your sightseeing trip to Kyoto better and create great memories by wearing a kimono or yukata with the person you love the most?

Nishijin

Nishijin è il nome con cui sono comunemente conosciuti diversi tipi di tessuti tradizionali di Kyoto. È il nome di una zona della città a ovest del palazzo imperiale, nel quartiere di Kamigyoku. Sebbene non sia un’area amministrativa designata, fin dai tempi antichi in questa zona si sono radunati i tessitori della città. In particolare, i laboratori tessili si sono diffusi a Nishijin dopo la Guerra di Onin (1467-1477), durante la ricostruzione successiva alla devastazione della città causata dalla guerra. Anche il nome Nishin ha origine nel periodo della Guerra di Onin

I nomi “Nishijin” e “tessuti Nishijin” sono marchi registrati presso l’Associazione degli Artigiani Tessili di Nishijin (陣織工業組合Nishijin Textile IndustryAssociation).

 

La produzione dei tessuti Nishijin

Si tratta di tessuti fantasia tinti in cui i disegni sono ottenuti intrecciando fili colorati. Prima della tessitura sono sottoposti a vari processi di lavorazione, la maggior parte dei quali sono affidati a specialisti di ogni singolo processo. La produzione si suddivide nelle fasi di pianificazione, preparazione delle materie prime, preparazione dei macchinari, tessitura e finitura. Con i tessuti Nishijin vengono prodotti vari articoli: kimono, cravatte, ombrelli, ecc.

I tessuti Nishijin sono definiti come prodotti tessili tinti ottenuti con metodi di lavorazione graduali. Sono prodotti vari tipi di tessuti di seta, quali spelling (legatura), broccato, castagna (dente di leone), Zhu Shin (Shuchin), kasuri, pongee, ecc. Questi tessuti che utilizzano filati multicolori di alta qualità sono estremamente raffinati e decorati con splendidi motivi.

 

Al giorno d’oggi ci sono molte iniziative per fare conoscere e diffondere i tessuti di Nishijin

L’Associazione degli Artigiani Tessili di Nishijin è impegnata in varie attività di pubbliche relazioni che coinvolgono sia i produttori sia i consumatori. Le iniziative principale sono la composizione e pubblicazioni di vari materiali informativi, quali grafici, opuscoli, mappe, annuari.

A Nishijin si possono visitare Nishjinkaikan Orinasukan, un museo dei tessuti Nishijin dove sono esposti tanti tessuti e capi di abbigliamento antichi e moderni, e si può vedere come vengono prodotti, nonché fare esperienza diretta del processo di produzione. Nishijinkaikan è specializzato nei tessuti Nishijin, ma a Orinasukaikan si possono vedere anche altri tipi di tessuti giapponesi.

http://nishijin.or.jp/eng/ (in inglese)

http://orinasukan.com/ (in giapponese)

 

Le mie scarpe sportive in tessuto di Nishijin

 

 

Borse in tessuto di Nishijin

 

 

 

Nishijinkaikan

Kyo-yuzen

La storia di kyo-yuzen
Yuzen è una tecnica tradizionale per realizzare disegni ornamentali su tessuti per kimono. Ci sono varie tradizioni di yuzen che prendono il nome dalle zone d’origine, ad esempio Tokyo-yuzen  e Kaga-yuzen, quest’ultima tipica di Kanazawa. Kyo-yuzen, la tecnica yuzen di Kyoto, è la più antica e la più famosa. Si dice che i disegni creati con la tecnica kyo-yuzen rendano la vita più ricca e interessante.
Al giorno d’oggi i tessuti lavorati con kyo-yuzen sono prodotti principalmente nella prefettura di Kyoto, in partcolare nelle città di Kyoto, Uji, Kameoka, Joyo, Muko, Kumiyama.
Si dice che Kyoyuzen sia nato nell’era Genroku del periodo Edo. Prima dell’era Genroku venivano usate varie tecniche di decorazione dei tesuti a ricamo e laminazione, ma tale tecniche erano considerate troppo lussose e perciò furono vietate in base a leggi suntuarie, cioè leggi contro il lusso eccessivo, promulgate dallo Shogunato (il governo del Giappone premoderno). La tecnica kyo-yuzen nacque proprio per sostituire le tecniche vietate, e il nome derivava dal nome del primo artigiano che utilizzò la tecnica, Miyazaki Yuzen (1654-1736), un pittore di ventagli di Gion. Ci sono due varianti principali della tecnica kyo-yuzen, la tecnica del disegno a mano e la tecnica del disegno a stampo, quest’ultima introdotta da Hirose Jisuke (1822-1890).

tessuto kyo-yuzen

Kimono kyo-yuzen

 

L’esecuzione di kyo-yuzen
I tessuti di seta sono tinti a mano o a stampo, e per i disegni più complessi ci sono fino a 14 fasi di lavorazione, ognuno affidato ad artigiani specializzati. Gli stampi di carta utilizzati sono molto elaborati e variopinti.

Caratteristiche
Per i disegni kyo-yuzen sono preferiti colori di tonalità tenue, di cui spesso è difficile capire il colore di base, applicati con grande cura e precisione per ottenere un risultatato elegante e sontuoso. I motivi ornamentali sono motivi tradizionali stilizzati, e oltre al colore vengono utilizzate anche altre tecniche quali ricami e lamine d’oro.

Miyazaki Yuzen
La tecnica originaria di disegno a mano è nata attorno alla metà del periodo Edo ad opera di Miyazaki Yuzen, che utilizzò la tecnica per decorare ventagli e gli indumenti tradizionali leggeri kosode. Miyazaki pubblicò un campionario di disegni che ha contribuito alla diffusione della tecnica.

Hirose Jisuke
All’inizio del periodo Meiji Hirose Jisuke creò una nuova tecnica kyo-yuzen, riuscendo a sviluppare una tecnica di disegno a stampo, utilizzando stampi in carta e colla per applicare i motivi ornamentali su tessuti crêpe.

 

Un disegno kyo-yuzen fatto da me

 

The Kimono Forest of Arashiyama, un’esibizione all’aperto di tessuti kyo-yuzen

Kyo-yuzen

by Mayumi Otsuka, Mai Takezawa, and Kanako Wakamatsu

You can see Kimono (old style Japanese clothes) all over Japan, but especially in Kyoto. Kimonos have many different patterns and colors, but do you know how many of them are actually designed? Well, the designs on kimonos are often achieved by dyeing, using a method known as Kyo-yuzen. Here, we would like to introduce some aspects of this unique dyeing method.

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Kimono

1. History of Japanese dyeing methods

2. What is Kyo-yuzen?

3. How to dye by using Kyo-yuzen

4. Kyo-yuzen in foreign countries

5. Actual experience of Kyo-yuzen

History of Japanese dyeing methods

There have been a lot of dyeing methods used in Japan over the years, and most of these were developed from Chinese dyeing types. These were introduced to Japan several thousand years ago, and taught by people from China or Korea, they formed the basis of Japanese dyeing tradition. Before this people dyed clothes very simply by applying different types of grass, flowers or even mud. In the Asuka era, in the middle of the 6th century, there was a system developed that divided people by the color of the clothes they wore. This was to distinguish between class and status, and required greater use of color in fabrics and design. In addition, in the Nara era, in the 8th century, international trade was increased, which meant further diversification in dyeing methods were introduced and spread all over Japan, with each area developing its own style. One of the most famous of these was Kyo-yuzen, a dyeing method created in Kyoto that became hugely popular. Next, we would like to introduce this unique and beautiful, traditional Japanese item.

What is Kyo-yuzen?

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Kyo-yuzen

Kyo-yuzen is one of the dyeing methods developed in Kyoto during the Edo era of the mid to late 17th century. At that time, there was an artist in Kyoto by the name of Miyazaki Yuzensai, who had built a reputation for the exquisitely drawn folding fans he produced.  Due to this, his patrons soon began to encourage him to apply his artistic skills to designs for kimono, too, which he did.  Following this, his name quickly came to be associated with top class kimono design in Kyoto, hence the name that was given to this particular dyeing style, Kyo-yuzen.

There are some interesting features unique to Kyo-yuzen that need to be noted.  First, it is possible to apply any kind of design you want, just like drawing a picture.  Second, there are many colors and hues used in the production of Kyo-yuzen pieces.  Third, a technique using elements of glutinous rice is used to guard against colors mixing or merging together.  Finally, Kyo-yuzen is done by combining more than one dyeing method, and requires several steps to achieve a final result.  Through this, Kyo-yuzen is quite superior to other dyeing methods and has become very popular all over the world.

Kyo-yuzen in foreign countries

As we said before, Kyo-yuzen is very famous globally.  For example, some events involving Japanese culture have been held recently in Paris, and there are sales booths for Kyo-yuzen products set up there.  At the booths, stainless steel mugs that are made in cooperation between Japanese Kyo-yuzen craftpersons and craftpersons in Paris are sold, and these are also available in Eigamura, a very famous sightseeing spot in Kyoto. Selling a large number of these mugs means expanding the exposure to traditional crafts of Kyoto to people in foreign countries

How to dye by using Kyo-yuzen

There are two main types of dyeing method used for Kyo-yuzen. One of these is hand painting, and the other is using stencils. First, we will explain the hand painting method:

  1. Think of the design you want for the cloth and make a design pattern  
  2. Trace the design onto the cloth
  3. Apply the special glue ② to prevent the colors from mixing with each other (this is called Itomenorioki)
  4. Apply the colors to the cloth
  5. Steam the cloth
  6. Wash the cloth
  7. Steam the cloth again and stretch out the wrinkles
  8. Using a stencil, draw the design onto special Japanese paper and cut out the pattern to make the stencil
  9. Paste the cloth onto a wooden board that is called “Yuzen-Ita”
  10. Put ① onto ② and dye
  11. Same as ⑤~⑦ of hand painting method

Actual experience of Kyo-yuzen

In Kyoto, visitors can actually experience Kyo-yuzen at some special studios.  Participants can experience dyeing cloth items like handkerchiefs, wrapping cloths, and so on.  One session is usually about one and a half hours long, and costs between 1,500 yen and 2,500 yen. Therefore, you can experience a traditional craft of Kyoto easily, and after the lesson, you can take the Kyo-yuzen item that you made with your own hands home with you.

Japanese dyeing methods have continued to develop over the centuries, and Kyo-yuzen especially. This method was created by combining a lot of different dyeing methods, which have been improved upon over time, and have become famous all over the world.  You can buy Kyo-yuzen items in many places in Kyoto, and you can also make them by yourself.  Why not give it a try!  

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Kyo-yuzen studio

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Kyo-yuzen items

One of the studios where you can experience Kyo-yuzen is “Marumasu-Nishimuraya” in Kyoto city.

Here’s their website:   http://www.marumasu-nishimuraya.co.jp/

You can reserve an experience time and get the access details there.

Furisode

By: Shiori Iwawaki, Hina Uematsu, Mina Ito

There are several types of kimono, and they vary from place to place. In this article, we will introduce ‘furisode’. Furisode is a kind of kimono and is important to Japanese because almost all Japanese women wear it at least once in their lifetime. We will look at what a furisode actually is and its history, and will introduce three typical situations where furisode can be seen.

 

History of the furisode

A furisode is a style of kimono that can be worn in the coming-of-age ceremony which is called Seijinshiki. The furisode originated in the mid-1500s as middle and upper-class children’s clothing for both sexes, and at that time it was not worn by adults. At first, furisode had quite short sleeves and were used as everyday wear. However, furisode is a form of very tight clothing, so some people couldn’t wear them all the time as they were not practical. As time went by, sleeves became bigger and bigger and they became an elegant form of dress worn mainly on special occasions. Nowadays, popular furisode have long sleeves, but at first they weren’t that long. In the Genroku Era, from 1688 to 1703, furisode sleeve lengths were about 55cm to 95cm, but in the Edo Era, furisode sleeve lengths became about 95cm to 122cm. There was actually a reason that the lengths became longer, and that was because they started to do special dances at that time, and the movements looked much more beautiful if they had longer sleeves.

 

According to a 17th century text, boys could wear furisode until their 18th year or until they went through their coming-of-age ceremony, while girls were supposed to stop wearing them when they married or reached their 20th year. Initially, furisode were not that different for boys and girls, but fabric designs started to become more gender specific in the 19th century.  In the 20th century, furisode became restricted to women only, mainly due to western influence on clothes for boys and girls. As the furisode became increasingly associated with young adult women, the shorter-sleeved children’s type became known as Wakiake.  This means open-sided, in English.

 

When and where they are worn

Furisode are mainly worn in three situations. One of them is at a wedding as an attendee and another is at Yuino. Yuino is a proof of engagement ceremony when both families and the matchmaker gather together. However, the most common situation for Japanese is at the coming-of-age ceremony. People who became 20 years old are called ‘seijin’ in Japan and a coming-of-age ceremony is held on the 2nd Monday in January. On that day, women who became 20 years old wear furisode and celebrate becoming ‘seijin’. Originally, furisode could only be worn by women who were not married, therefore, almost all women wear furisode in the ceremony even though they are already married. Also the design of furisode has changed. In the past, the designs of furisode were older, traditional patterns, which could fit the Japanese mind, but now, along with the times, the designs are changing to more common patterns like leopard print. There are many more kinds of design than a long time ago, so we can choose from a large variety of patterns of furisode. The clothes which we wear today are comfortable to wear and easy to move in, too. On the other hand, furisode are very tight and hard to wear and move and run in.

Do you know the differences between kimono and furisode? Actually, they are basically the same. As there are many kinds of dresses, so there are many kinds of kimono. All furisode have long sleeves, but they can be divided into three different types, which are ko-furisode, chu-furisode and o-furisode. The ko-furisode is usually worn with a hakama for graduation ceremonies. The sleeves are a little bit shorter than furisode sleeves at about 75-87cm long, but they are still longer than standard female kimono sleeves. The chu-furisode is the most common type of furisode. Young girls usually wear it during their coming-of-age ceremony. The chu-furisode has medium size sleeves somewhere between ko-furisode and o-furisode, and the sleeves are about 91-106cm long. The o-furisode, also called the hon-furisode, is the most formal furisode, and mostly worn by brides. The O-furisode has super long 114-125cm sleeves, as well as a train. They are quite heavy, and difficult to walk around in. Furisode come in various styles and designs and it is lovely to see women and girls still wearing them in modern society, on their wedding days, special occasions, and especially on the day of the coming-of-age ceremony.

Hina Uematsu wear red furisode

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Shiori Iwawaki wear blue furisode

 


Mina Ito wear pink furisode

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hina Uematsu’s ribbon color is black with white flower

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Mina Ito’s ribbon color is black with yellow and pick flower

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Shiori Iwawaki’s ribbon is gold with red and green flower

 

 

 

Geta

by Mayumi Otsuka, Mai Takezawa and Kanako Wakamatsu

Maybe you know “Kimono”, which is a traditional style of Japanese clothing, but how about “Geta”?  Geta are a kind of shoe or sandal, and Japanese people wear them when they wear Kimono, like women wear high heels when they wear dresses.  Here, we are going to introduce Geta to you in three ways:

  • What are Geta?
  • History of Geta
  • Different types of Geta

In addition, we are also going to give you some surprising facts about this interesting Japanese clothes item.

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Geta

What are Geta?

As we mentioned before, Geta are a kind of old Japanese style shoe and people wear them with Kimono or Yukata, in general.

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Kimono

Geta are usually made of wood, with the price changing by the kind of wood used. If Geta are made of “Kiri”, for example, then they would be a high price indeed. There are some different styles of geta, but in general, they have three main components to them; “Dai”, “Ha”, and “Hanao”.  Dai is the base board that people put their feet on, and Ha are the pieces of wood that support the Dai from below. Ha means teeth in Japanese, and the name comes from the side view of a Geta.  Geta usually have 2 “Ha”. The Hanao is made of cloth and it is placed on the Dai. When people wear Geta, the Hanao passes between the big toe and the second toe, a little like a beach sandal. Geta consist of these 3 parts, and this type of Geta is the latest type. Then, how about the old style?

History of Geta

In olden times, Geta were made and used as work shoes in Japan. In the Yayoi period (about BC 300 ~ BC 300) people in Japan started using “Ta-Geta” (“Ta” means “rice field” in Japanese). At that time, rice farming was started, and people could not move easily in the rice fields because the ground was muddy and soft. Therefore, they made Ta-Geta to make it easier to work in rice fields. However, Ta-Geta did not have Ha and their Hanao were made of straw. Furthermore, another style, “Nezura-Geta” (“Nezura” is a kind of fish in Japan), were used on the beach or in the shallows. Nezura-Geta had needles attached to their soles, like spiked shoes, and people wore them to catch fish.

During the Heian period, (BC 794 ~ BC 1185), one type of Geta, “Takaba”, which had only one Ha, were worn by priests. They usually wore them when they climbed up and down a mountain. It sounds very difficult to climb up and down a mountain wearing Takaba, but apparently they were quite suitable for slippery mountain roads. However, towards the end of this era, nearly all the common people wore “Zouri” (that were made only of straw and very simple) instead of Geta, and Geta became a rare and expensive thing for the average person.   

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Zouri

It wasn’t until the Edo era (BC 1603 ~ BC 1868) that people started to wear Geta again, and this was because people started to become more interested in fashion.  They wore Geta not only as work shoes, but also as a fashion item. Also, up to then, Geta had usually only been worn on rainy days, however, from the middle of the Edo period, people began to wear them on sunny days, too. Thereafter, the skill of making Geta improved and the shops selling them began to appear, and in greater numbers. Because of this, more than 200 kinds of Geta were made at that time, and Geta became more and more famous among common people. So, what types are there around now?

Different types of Geta

Actually, there are many kinds of Geta still worn now, and a good example is “Ippon-Geta”. They have only one Ha, supporting piece, and are very good for your body balance. If you wear them, it can make your upper body stronger. It is also said that wearing Ippon-Geta can heal back pain or gonalgia, too. Another type is called “Tengu-Geta” because it has been said this type of Geta was worn by Tengu, a sort of Japanese monster, and also god, that has a long nose and red face. This simple variety is very similar to the Ta-Geta we introduced earlier.

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Ippon-Geta

Finally, we have “Okobo”. Okobo are often worn by Maiko. We talked about Maiko in a previous article:  

http://thekyotoproject.org/english/the-long-journey-of-becoming-a-maiko/)

The height of an Okobo is about 10cm, and are worn mostly by women. In the “Shichi-Go-San”, a festival in Japan to celebrate the healthy growth of children, girls often wear them. They also go by some other names, including Pokkuri, Koppori or Bokkuri, but this is different from place to place.

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Okobo

Conclusion

Geta is a traditional Japanese shoe, and, in olden times people used them as work shoes. Now, however, they are worn still as a fashion item, too. Recently, in Kyoto, the number of rental Kimono shops is increasing because of the number of foreign visitors interested in this style. If you go to one of these shops, you can try wearing Kimono and Geta and go sightseeing with them on. Also, most of the shops have hairstylists, so if you are women, you can try a traditional hairstyle. It costs around 3,000 yen 〜 6,000 yen, so we recommend you to try it. It may be difficult to walk wearing Geta for the first time, but it really is a uniquely Japanese traditional experience. You will surely enjoy Kyoto even more if you try out the old Japanese clothes style, Kimono and Geta!

Kimono – Past and Present

by  Haruna Masuzaki, Kazuki Nakamoto and Hikari Yanagihara

Kimono is a kind of traditional Japanese garment with a very long history. Originally, the word ‘kimono’ was kurumono, which means ‘wearing thing’. It was later shortened to ‘kimono’. Kimono are often worn on special occasions, like festivals or weddings. They are often beautiful, colorful and representative of traditional Japanese culture. Kimono are instantly recognized around the world as being Japanese.  

Kimono is a kind of traditional Japanese garment with a very long history.

Kimono

 

Kimono Material

The material of kimono is generally silk. Some kimono are created from silk that is dyed before weaving, while some kimono are dyed after weaving. The most common are those weaved from dyed silk.

In addition to silk, other materials used are cotton, polyester, and wool. Kimono made from cotton and polyester is easy to wash. On the other hand, wool kimono are very cheap and great for the winter, but are susceptible to being eaten by worms during storage.

The material of kimono is generally silk.

Silk

 

When Do People Wear Kimono?

Most Japanese people wear their kimono on special occasions. However, it is also possible to wear a kimono in daily life, as fashion. This is more common amongst older people than younger people. They may wear kimono to go out to eat, to visit a museum, to seeing the cherry blossoms or autumn leaves, to go shopping downtown, and so on.  On type of kimono that is worn in during summer festivals is a yukata. At first glance, it appears just like a traditional kimono, but in fact it is very lightweight, with no inner lining. It is also very casual and festive. Both men and women wear them. June through September is the most common time to see people wearing yukata. In the old days, people put on their yukata after a summer bath, and enjoyed the coolness as they fell asleep in their yukata.

The Origin of Kimono

The kimono has a long history as a beautiful and tasteful traditional Japanese garment recognized around the word. There are several reasons why it is appreciated by so many people. One is that it grew out of harmony with Japanese life and culture. For example, it is ideally suited for the Japanese climate. There are different thicknesses for different seasons. Also, kimono come in many shapes and sizes, and can be used for many different purposes. They can also be layered, to adapt to any temperature or weather condition.

Heian period (794~1185)

Kimono came to prominence during the Heian period.

Heian kimono

 

Kimono came to prominence during the Heian period. During this time, a new technique was developed for making kimono that allowed makers to not worry about the wearer’s body shape. It also made the kimono easier to wear and easier to fold and store. In addition, people began to pay more attention to the color of kimono. Original colors and patterns began to emerge, and many of them were related to the various seasons and times of the year. People of the upper classes wore gorgeous kimono. Common people, on the other hand, tended to wear kimono with short sleeves. Like the traditional kimono, the yukata is said to have also originated in the Heian period. Noblemen from the Heian period used to take stream baths. Some people began to wear a garment called a yukatabira, which served to protect their skin from steam burns. Nowadays, the yukatabira is the thin cotton garment worn under the kimono. But back in those days, it was not cotton, but rather hemp that was used by most people. Cotton was more expensive than hemp. People used to walk back and forth to the bathhouse in their Yukatabira. The yukatabira eventually evolved into what we now know as the much more colorful and festive yukata.

Kamakura period (1192~1333)

During the Kamakura period, there were many wars. For this reason, the kimono was simplified to be more practical.

Muromachi period (1392~1573)

In Muromachi period, the form of what we now recognize as the contemporary kimono appeared. Dyeing skills of kimono makers made remarkable progress during this time period.

Edo period (1603~1857)

Japanese dress of the day is born in this period. This period also progress. At the time, people wear the same as present kimono.

Meiji Period (1867~1911)

During this period, Japan was heavily influenced by western cultures and industrialization. For this reason, more people started wearing western clothes. This set the tone for the current modern age, when kimono are mostly worn on special occasions.

Modern Japan

Japanese people now wear western clothes in their daily life, as it is easier, cheaper, and more practical to do so. However, this decreases their chances to wear kimono. For this reason, kimono is now reserved for special events and occasions.   Recently, kimono has started to be worn as fashion. For example, a kimono that it is easy to take off and put on has been developed.

How to Buy a Kimono

Buying a kimono is not so easy for the first time buyer. If you are one of these people, you should keep a few things in mind before you buy one.  First, if you have some Japanese friends, you should ask which shop is good. Also, you should visit a lot of shops so that you can compare a kimono you like in one shop with that of another shop. When you visit a shop, talk with the salesclerk about where you plan to wear the kimono, what kind of season you want to wear it in, and what your budget is. Then, the salesclerk will help you find a kimono that matches your look. Then you can pay for the one that looks the best on you.   Finally, you must remember that a kimono is expensive property. You should always take care of your kimono and wear it with a fresh feeling. In the case that kimono gets stained with something, you must have the stains removed in the shop. Please take good care of your precious kimono.

How to Rent a Kimono

kimono rental is a good option.

Kimono rental

For many people, buying a kimono is too expensive, especially if they only wear it once or twice. Therefore, kimono rental is a good option. There are many kimono shops in Kyoto. Most of them will rent a kimono to you all day long.   One good place to rent a kimono is the Kiyomizuzaka shop, which is only a one-minute walk from the famous Kiyomizu-dera Temple. This shop is located on the street where many souvenir stores are visited by large number of sightseers. The set rental plan at this shop is only 3,000 yen. It includes a kimono, an obi (belt), a bag, and some tabi (Japanese sandals), all in one set. Moreover, you can select from 30 different sets to suit your mood. You can try more of them on for fun. Also, you can do some sightseeing while wearing your rental kimono.

How to Put on a Kimono

In order to put on your kimono correctly, you must follow several steps. First, turn position the kimono behind your back while making sure the collar is centered. The center seam should be in the middle of the back. Second, decide the width of outer skirt. Hold the end of the kimono collars and then raise them up under the side. After that, take down the hem to just above the floor. Then wrap the right side panels first, so that the end of the right collar should be put on the left waist. Next, decide the width of before under. Wrap the left side of panels first, and the end of a collar should be put on the right waist. Next, while holding the right panel, wrap the left panel over it. Next, put on the koshihimo (waist cord), just below your navel. Then, make a ohashori, which is the fold made at the waist so that women can adjust the length of their kimono. Put both hands through arm holes under the sleeves, and smooth out any excess material, both on the front and back. The line of the fold should be straight. Finally, check how the kimono looks in the mirror.

How to Wear Make-up with Kimono

The quality and appearance of your facial skin is very important when wearing kimono. Your face looks good in a matte color, not a glossy color. This is because kimono looks best in an impersonal type of beauty. First, draw your eyebrows in a long and merry way. This is because your kimono probably has a loud pattern. Also, your eyes are the most important. Apply eyeliner on the upper eyelid to create the impression of long narrow eyes. After that, apply eye shadow using the color of a similar tone. Try not to use eyelash curlers. This will impress a person favorably. Finally, apply red lipstick to your lips. In this way, you can make sure that your appearance in a kimono is a gorgeous one.

Hairstyles Popular with Kimono

Kimono looks best when the woman wearing it has an elegant hairstyle.

Hair style

 

Kimono looks best when the woman wearing it has an elegant hairstyle. Yakaimaki (evening party roll hairstyle) is the most popular for kimono because it allows others to view the beautiful neck of the woman wearing the kimono. It also creates a distinctive silhouette, which is a round shape. Finally, the hairstyle truly becomes gorgeous when a hair ornament is used.

As you can see, kimono have a long tradition and history, and have been loved by Japanese people for a long time. Now, Japanese people wear western clothes in their daily life, but foreigners who come to Japan also want to try wearing kimono. Why don’t you wear Kimono?

Access to Kiyomizuzaka Shop

Take the bus bound for Kiyomizudera, Gion and Ginkakuji from Kyoto station. You should get off Gojo-zaka. Plese go up Gojo-zaka, you will see Kiyomizuzaka on the right. It is about 5 minutes.

Kyo-Kanoko

 

Learning how to Kyo-Kanoko: A special trip to the Miyako-messe

 

by Manami Otahara & Miki Sawai

14/12/2015

 

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Today we went to Miyako-messe. Miyako-messe is a museum, you can see traditional crafts in Kyoto. When we entered in Miyako-messe, we were very surprised, because there are many people in there. In Miyako-messe, you can see demonstration by craftspeople. The demonstrations are very powerful, so we were excited. Next, we went to the souvenir corner. You can buy many kind of traditional crafts. For example, scarfs, bags, hair accessories and so on, however we were most impressed by the Kanoko.

There are 74 traditional crafts in Kyoto. Everybody knows about kimono, however not everyone knows Kanoko. What is Kanoko? There are two patterns of kimono, one is dyed, another is woven. Kanoko is dyed cloth. Kanoko is used for Kimono and Kanoko is one of the 74 crafts.  However it is different from dyed Kimono. There are many bits and wrinkles. How is it made? It is made from one piece of cloth. The cloth is made by craftspeople. Craftspeople twist one by one.

How many twists do you think it takes to make Kanoko? One hundred? One thousand? This Kimono is twisted three hundred thousand times. When people make Shibori Kimono, it takes 6 months to 1 year. Why does it take a lot of time?   Why is called it Kanoko shibori?   The reason is because Kanoko means young deer in Japanese. Japanese people believe Kanoko looks like a deer pattern, therefore people say Kanoko.

History

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In 7c, Kanoko was introduced to Japan from India. This was written about in a book and there are some Waka poems about Kanoko Shibori from 7c as well. In 10c, Shibori was worn by princesses, princes, and rich people. In the Edo period, it was around as a brand clothes in Japan, and it was made in Kyoto, which was called Kyo-Kanoko Shibori. For a long time, craftspeople passed on the technique of how to twist from generation to generation.

In Kyoto, are there many souvenirs? If you come to Kyoto, what souvenir will you buy? Sweets? Kimono? Macha? I recommend Kanoko. Kanoko is used to make hair accessories and it is a reasonable price. Kanoko Kanzashi is a good item, because Maiko wear Kanzashi. Kanzashi is a hair accessory, and it is able to hold up your hair with only one stick. It is very cute! Another one is furoshiki, it is big cloth, so it can wrap ground something. For example, you can wrap a present in it to become a bag so it is easy to carry. If you come to Kyoto, you should buy a Kanoko item for a souvenir for your family.

Address

Miyako-messe

9-1, Okazaki Seisyoji-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, 606-8343

Japanese Traditional Cloth (Kimono)

by Erina Okamoto and Arisa Hirano

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Have you ever seen Japanese traditional clothes? Most countries have their own clothes, For example, people wear chima jeogori in Korea, China dress in China and deel in Mongolia. In Japan, we have our own traditional clothes called Kimono. Kimono has a long history and it is a tradition which we are proud of.

 

 

About Kimono

 

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These days, although Japanese people usually wear Western clothes, kimono is still loved by many people. The reason why kimono is loved by many people is not only the beauty, but also the fact that Kimono can adapt to the Japanese culture. It is said that kimono fits the person who has no waist and sloping shoulder. Moreover, we can use the word kimono as an international word all over the world. Originally, kimono is “kirumono” which means the cloth we wear. After that, it became “kimono” for short. Kimono exist for long time, however, it is around Heian era that kimono became the present form.

 

 

 

< charm of Kimono >

 

image8 Kimono has four charms. First, everyone fits the kimono. Kimono fits all bodies. Kimono is a straight stich, wrap tied with an obi is a self. In many cases, kimono is passed on from mother to child, to grandchild. Also, the feeling is passed on, too. Second, we can recycle kimono if we stop wearing it. The first cotton is about 13meters. Kimono is made of eight cotton clothes which are cut. We can change kimono into gadgets such as obi, bag, and nagazuban. Nagazuban is underwear when we wear under kimono. Third, we can fold it up small. When you hang dresses, you need plenty of space because then it wrinkle so easily. However, kimono is very compact, so we can hang many kimono. Fourth, the design is only one. Originally, kimono don’t often make same design. They looked the same, but the color scheme was little different. Then, we choose some items like the color of obi, the form of obi and kakeeri. Kakeeri is a protective collar sewn on a kimono. Therefore, perhaps even if you wear the same kimono, the image changes using some items.

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Kimono has these good points. Kimono is made of silk so that it make us feel cool in summer and warm in winter. In addition, when we wear kimono, our movement becomes slowly and politely. It make us feminine and elegant. It’s the best point for women.

When you go to a party, what clothes do you wear? You may not wear a T-shirt but a dress. People choose the clothes depending on where they go. We‘ll introduce rule of kimono and compare western clothes with kimono.

When people go to a celebration such a wedding ceremony, a celebration, or a coming-of-age celebration, they wear morning dress, evening dress or long dress. With kimono, people wear kurotomesode, irotomesode, and furisode. Married women wear Kurotomesode or irotomesode and unmarried women wear furisode. At the party, people wear cocktail dresses, but for kimono, they wear a kimono which called houmongi. It shows the high status. When we go to a ceremony, we wear formal suit, but with kimono, we wear tsukesage. The design is few and it’s more simple than the houmonngi. Like these, kimono has various kinds and choices in the situation. If you remember this, it’ll be useful.

 

< casual Kimono >

 

Aimage9s we wrote, Japan has many kinds of Kimono. If you would like to wear a Japanese Kimono, we have casual kimono. It’s called “Yukata”. Yukata has some good points. It is thinner than Kimono, cheaper and easier to wear. We can buy it for about 10,000 yen. However, Japanese don’t have the opportunity to wear it so much. Therefore we often wear Yukata at summer festival. If we see people who are wearing Yukata, we feel like summer is here. A woman who is wearing Yukata is considered very beautiful by man because it is different than usual. Young Japanese girls long to go to a summer festival with a boyfriend.

< trend of Kimono >

 

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Of course Kimono has trendy designs. In the past, many people prefer to wear Kimono with small flower and butterfly. These Kimonos are cool. But now we prefer  pop design like this.(left picture) These Kimonos are cute. This design is called “Kotengara”. Design is a bit bigger than before, and the color is more bright.

 

Kimono and the culture of kimono are very deep and wonderful. We are glad if you have interest in kimono. If you have a chance to wear kimono, please enjoy feeling Japanese culture.