Kyoto’s Historical Boulevard

October 16, 2017

by Takumi Abe

Many people who visit Kyoto want to seeonly  Kiyomizu temple, Kinkakuji temple or the Ryoanji rock garden. However, when most people first arrive in Kyoto, they will see the Kyoto Tower and a wide avenue going to the north. This street has many cars, taxis and buses. Its name is Karasuma-dori, and its length is six kilometers. Karasuma street is an important and central street in Kyoto, so there are many business buildings and some temples along it.  In addition, two universities are located on Karasuma, and the Kyoto Imperial Palace flanks the avenue as well. It is an important street especially from the views of the economy, education and Japanese history.

Karasuma from 794

Kyoto city has prospered for about 1200 years so many streets in Kyoto have a long history. If you walk down Karasuma street, you can see buildings from various eras. Karasuma was constructed in the Heian period (794-1185). At that time, this road was called Karasumaru-koji street. “Koji” means small road. This street was named after a family of Heian-period aristocrats. Karasuma has been significant because among the many Fujiwara families it was the largest area where Heian aristocrats lived. The street flourished,  but it fell into ruinduring the civil war in Medieval times. After this period of battles, the street was revived by Hideyoshi Toyotomi. Due to his project, the street had many upper-class mansions, houses and stores. In  the Meiji period (1868-1912),  one of the modern Japanese periods, Kyoto Station was built at the south end of Karasuma street. As a result, this street was expanded and extended to all the way to northern Kyoto. At the same time, a streetcar started to run along the street. Today, Karasuma is in the central business district, where there are many banks and companies. Additionally, it is a gateway to Kyoto for people from various countries first arriving at Kyoto Station.

 

The gateway of Kyoto

What you can see on Karasuma

Shijo Karasuma

Shijo-Karasuma is one of the big commercial areas in the city. Many banks and insurance companies are located here. You can see the modern Japanese architecture and a long history. On the left side of the above photo of Shijo -Karasuma is the Mitsui building. This entrance was created in 1941.

Cocon Karasuma

Doshisha University

Cocon Karasuma is a commercial complex and office building. You may be fascinated by the arabesque pattern on the wall. This building was constructed in 1938, and it was recently renovated. It was not exposed the fires of war, so you can see the old-style stairs and floors inside. “Cocon,” in Japanese means both ancient and modern, so this amazing building shows the past  and the present in Kyoto.

If you continue much further north on Karasuma you will come to Doshisha University. This university was founded in 1875, and now about 27,000 students go to this school. It was established by Jyo Nijima. He was the first Japanese person to graduate from a university in the USA. He opened the door to modern education in Japan.

Toraya

If you want to eat Japanese sweets, I recommend that you go to Toraya. It has a long history, and this store has been around for nearly five centuries. From the days of old, this store made sweets for the Emperor. Its famous itme is Azuki-bean jelly. It has been loved for more than 500 years. Is is on Karasuma just southwest of Doshisha University.

Traditional culture inJapan is not only concerned with food, but there is also kadou or literally “the way of flowers”. Kadou is arranging flowers beautifully. It represents and expresses the beauty of Japan. Kadou was formed in the Muromachi era (1336-1573). It is said that it originated at the pond of Rokkakuji temple. This temple is crowded with tourists. Next to it on Karasuma is the headquarters of the Ikenobo School of Flower arrangement.

Manga museum

Moreover, people who love Japanese culture had better go to the Manga museum, which is nearby the Oike-Karasuma intersection. As the name indicates, this museum keeps more 30 thousand manga. You can read manga in the museum or in its garden. The Giga-Ukiyoe, which is a collection of funny pictures and was printed in the Edo era (1603-1867), is in the collection of the museum. Moreover, some manga housed here are from overseas. The amazing thing is that this building has been used since 1929. it used to be an elementary school, therefore you can see also the old style of Japanese school.

The street as a face of Kyoto

Kyoto Imperial Palace

Karasuma street has a long history. It is rare that you can see a story that is 1200 years long. This place has faces of traditional Japan, modern Japan and present-day Japan. You can feel a Japanese passion to create the city, protect its heritage, and reinvigorate its culture.  The street is bustling with university students and some of its cafés are filled with young power. What is more, many workers use the street to find lunch or dinner, or go shopping. In  old times, there were many people riding in a carriage or walking in kimono. Suppose you come to Karasuma—you may feel the history of Japan.

 

Manga-Museum

by Tadashi Ashida; Takahiro Arie

 

Das internationale Comic-Museum Kyoto (Manga-Museum)

Das internationale Comic-Museum Kyoto erregt jetzt großes Aufsehen. Es liegt im Zentrum der Stadt Kyoto, in Karasuma / Oike, und es ist sowohl eine Bibliothek, wie auch ein Museum. Die Ausstellung wendet sich auch bewusst an ausländische Besucher, die Erläuterungen zu den Ausstellungsobjekten sind mehrsprachig abgefasst und es gibt auch viele Objekte ausländischen Ursprungs. Man bemüht sich, ein internationales Zentrum der Comic-Kultur zu sein.
Täglich kommen ungefähr 1000 Besucher, extra auch von weit her, um die Ausstellung oder die Veranstaltungen im Museum anzusehen.
15% der Gäste kommen aus dem Ausland, die meisten aus Europa, aber auch die Zahl der asiatischen Besucher nimmt zu.
Wenn man von Kyoto spricht, denkt man vor allem an buddhistische Tempel und shintoistische Schreine,
aber dieses Comic-Museum scheint anzufangen, eine neue wichtige Touristenattraktion zu werden.


Hier können Sie Manga auf dem Rasen liegend lesen oder draußen spazieren gehen und sich unterhalten, man kann sich hier gut entspannen.
Im Erdgeschoss gibt es Manga für Jungen, im ersten Stock Manga für Mädchen und im zweiten Stock Manga für Erwachsene.
Es gibt hier auch 1340 ausländische Manga Die Universität Leipzig arbeitet an der Sammlung mit.

Das Gebäude war früher eine Grundschule, und man hat versucht, die alte, wunderbare Atmosphäre zu erhalten.
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Öffnungszeit: 10:00~18:00
Bei besonderen Veranstaltungen gelten andere Öffnungszeiten.

Eintrittsgeld: Erwachsene 500 Yen
Schüler der Mittel- und Oberstufe 300 Yen
Grundschüler 100 Yen

Ruhetag: Jeder Mittwoch und die Zeit um den Jahreswechsel